Mid Week Meditation


Mid Week Meditation - July 2, 2019

Submitted on: July 3, 2019

Based on Biblical Text: Romans 12:3 (KJV)

 “For I say, through the grace given unto me, to every man that is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think; but to think soberly, according as God hath dealt to every man the measure of faith.”

As the Body of Christ, we stand on the principle of “Love Thy Neighbor.” “Love thy neighbor” is a principal that we wear as a banner of affirmation to our Christian way of thinking. However, in order to love our neighbor, we must learn to tolerate our differences. We are challenged to love our neighbor without liking what he or she represents, does, or thinks.

Despite our differences, there is common ground on which we can all stand. The common ground is treating each other with the respect due as human beings. There are certain common decencies we should all be afforded.

A reason we find “loving thy neighbor” difficult could very well be that we think more highly of ourselves than we ought to think! It is when we put ourselves on a higher plane than our neighbor, that we fail to acknowledge their basic rights as human beings. When it comes to common decency, as Christians, we need to remind ourselves not to be so high and mighty. Paul admonishes us, “Don’t think too highly of yourself”. Later on in his letter to the fledgling church at Rome, Paul challenges, “Be not wise in your own conceits.” (Romans 12:16).

We can be so puffed up with pride and arrogance that our vision becomes clouded by our own air of superiority. It is then we run the risk of thinking we are better than anyone else. Unfortunately, then we stop listening. Listening is the key to peace.

The truth is humility goes a long way to resolving differences. A humble person is more inclined to listen to another person and consider another person’s viewpoint. This is a sign of respect. The prophet Amos asked, “Can two walk together, except they be agreed?” (Amos 3:3)

Humility reveals much about us. Humility demonstrates our willingness to put someone else above ourselves. Humility serves to take into account our own shortcomings. Humility helps us extend the same courtesy to someone, that we desire for ourselves.

Jesus taught us, “Judge not, that ye be not judged” (Matthew 7:1) As Christians we are called to share the Gospel and leave judgment to the Lord. We are personally responsible for our own soul’s salvation. We are commanded to share the gospel with others understanding the decision is theirs, not ours. That is why Paul told the church at Corinth, “But let a man examine himself” (1 Corinthians 11:28).

We must examine ourselves. Do I think more highly of myself than I ought to? Do I need to come down off my high horse? Is my head in the clouds?

It is a good idea sometimes to ask a friend we can trust to be honest with us. We should not get angry at the answer. We are challenged to humble ourselves and work to fix it. If we truly desire an effectual relationship with mankind, we need not be so high and mighty.

 

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